Ocr English Literature As Level Coursework

A Students’ Guide to Writing an Effective A Level Essay »

Steve Campsall | Friday January 12, 2018

Categories: Archived Resources, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, AQA A Level Generic Skills, AQA A Level Skills Resources, EDEXCEL A Level, Edexcel A Level Generic Skills, Edexcel A Level Skills Resources, OCR A Level, OCR A Level Generic Skills, OCR A Level Skills Resources, WJEC A Level, WJEC A Level Generic Skills, WJEC A Level Skills Resources, Hot Entries, Writing, Analytical Writing, Essays

Teacher’s Note

What follows is a guide written for students that, I hope, will help them write more effective essays. Even an essay that gains a lowly grade will often be the result of a substantial amount of time and effort from the student; and the chances are that he or she felt all along that their writing was ‘going wrong’ somehow – but press on they must, on to what must at times seem like the bitter end. How frustrating and perhaps even belittling this process can be for the student – and how much, too, it likely reduces that...

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An A Level Guide to Context »

Steve Campsall | Friday January 12, 2018

Categories: Archived Resources, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, AQA A Level Generic Skills, AQA A Level Skills Resources, AQA A Level Pre-2015 Resources, AQA A Level English Language A, AQA A Level English Language B, AQA A Level English Language & Literature A, AQA A Level English Language & Literature B, AQA A Level English Literature A, AQA A Level English Literature B, EDEXCEL A Level, Edexcel A Level Generic Skills, Edexcel A Level Skills Resources, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, Edexcel A Level Pre-2015 Resources, EDEXCEL A Level English Language & Literature, EDEXCEL A Level English Language, OCR A Level, OCR A Level Pre-2015 Resources, OCR A Level English Language & Literature, OCR A Level English Language, OCR A Level English Literature, WJEC A Level, WJEC A Level Generic Skills, WJEC A Level Skills Resources, WJEC A Level Pre-2015 Resources, WJEC A Level English Language & Literature, WJEC A Level English Language, WJEC A Level English Literature, Hot Entries, Writing, Contextual Research

Teacher’s Note

Below is an EnglishEdu Student Guide that will, hopefully, help your own students to a deeper and useful understanding of the key idea of context. Many students struggle with this concept which, along with purpose, audience and genre must surely rank as one of the four key aspects of all texts; indeed, it could be argued that, along with the individual writer or speaker of a text, context is the main aspect of central concern as, from these two, all others flow. With that in mind, this guide also touches on purpose, audience...

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A level English Literature Guide to John Donne Selected Poems »

Theresa Sowerby | Wednesday August 20, 2014

Categories: Hot Entries, Poetry, Donne, Selected Poems, Writing, Poetry Analysis, AQA A Level English Literature A, LITA4, OCR A Level English Literature, F664, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, OCR A Level

The following guide to Donne’s poems is designed to give examples both of close reading and of links between the poems. It will be useful for teachers of WJEC Lit 4 and for anyone considering Donne as a choice for A2 coursework e.g. for the poetry element of Unit 4 OCR.

Contents

  1. Biography and context
  2. The Metaphysical poets
  3. Approaching a Donne poem – A Valediction of Weeping
  4. Key Characteristics of Donne’s poetry
  5. Variety of Attitudes to love – connections and groupings
  6. A Closer Look at five love poems:
    • The Sunne Rising
    • The Apparition...
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OCR A2 Unit F663 Guide to John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore’ »

Sarah Knightley | Friday June 27, 2014

Categories: Archived Resources, KS5 Archive, OCR A Level, OCR A Level Pre-2015 Resources, OCR A Level English Literature, F663, Drama, Tis Pity She's a Whore, Hot Entries, Poetry, Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience, Writing, Drama Analysis

Guide Navigation

Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson One, Two and Three
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Four, Five and Six
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Seven, Eight and Nine
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Ten, Eleven and Twelve
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Thirteen, Fourteen and Fifteen
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Sixteen, Seventeen and Eighteen
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Nineteen, Twenty and Twenty One

Associated Resources

  • OCR A Level English Literature Specification.pdf

Exemplar Past Paper Questions

Drama Comparisons

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A Level Teacher’s Guide to T. S. Eliot’s Poem The Waste Land »

Paul Merrell | Monday April 14, 2014

Categories: Hot Entries, Poetry, Eliot, The Waste Land, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET01, AQA A Level English Language & Literature A, ELLA1, AQA A Level English Literature A, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB1, EDEXCEL A Level English Language & Literature, 6EL03, OCR A Level English Literature, F661, WJEC A Level English Literature, LT1, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level

click on image to enlarge

I love teaching this text; in fact, I see it as one of the most versatile (and important) things that I deliver across all of my KS5 classes – be it A Level, Pre-U or on the IB.

I know Eliot’s poetry appears in various forms across a wide range of specifications and courses, but I more often than not teach this poem as either a comparative coursework text or, more generally, as key AO4 information for any Modernist writer. I don’t know how, for example, you could prepare a class on Waugh’s A Handful of...

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A Level English Language Guide to Language Investigation »

Theresa Sowerby | Thursday April 03, 2014

Categories: Writing, Analytical Writing, Comparative Analysis, Comparing & Contrasting, Language Investigations, Textual Analysis, AQA A Level English Language B, ENGB4, EDEXCEL A Level English Language, 6EN04, OCR A Level English Language, F654, WJEC A Level English Language, LG3, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level

click on image to enlarge

How to introduce the AQA English Language B A2 Investigation to enable students to handle their own chosen material with confidence.

  • This guide focuses on the second section of the AQA A2 English Language unit ENGB4. Teachers of other examination board units will, however, hopefully find the guide easily adaptable to their own requirements, for example the Language Investigation parts of WJEC Unit LG3, Edexcel Unit 4, and OCR Unit F654.

Most students need support and guidance in setting up their investigations so...

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A Level English Literature Guide to Jane Austen’s Novel Persuasion »

Steph Atkinson | Wednesday April 02, 2014

Categories: Prose, Analysing Prose, Persuasion, Writing, Essays, Literary Analysis, Linguistic Analysis, Prose Analysis, AQA A Level English Language & Literature A, ELLA2, ELLA4, AQA A Level English Language & Literature B, ELLB2, ELLB4, EDEXCEL A Level English Language & Literature, 6EL02, 6EL04, OCR A Level English Language & Literature, F671, WJEC A Level English Language & Literature

How do I write a comparative essay for English?

Comparative essays can be quite daunting. It’s difficult to achieve a balance between texts and to know where to start comparing them – sometimes they can be completely different after all. At A-level I had to write a comparative essay on Webster’s The White Devil and Milton’s Paradise Lost, for example, which are completely different genres. Yet any differences or similarities you can pick up on. So I would definitely talk about the fact that these are different genres. The White Devil is a play so how would it be performed when it was published/now and how would this make a difference? Would we have sympathy with Flamineo because he talks directly to the audience? More sympathy than we might have for Satan in Paradise Lost?

Comparative essays raise a lot of questions about the texts and it’s difficult to know how you can include these in a sophisticated argument.

DON’T PANIC however.

Sometimes it’s a good thing when texts are so different because ‘comparative’ doesn’t JUST mean ‘what do they do the same?’ although you can address this but also ‘what do they do differently?’ You could look at how themes such as love or war are treated differently i.e. through different stylistic choices or how the writers have different responses to them (perhaps due to their differing contexts). You could use a quote by a critic and see how it applies to one text and not to another.

 It’s also important to remember to meet all the criteria for an exam/coursework essay. For example, OCR A level English asks you to meet certain A0s or objectives in your work, so you have to spend a certain amount of time in your essay looking at the context of both texts and then in language analysis AS WELL AS in comparison between the texts. The best thing to do is use the context or language to support/argue with a comparison. So if you are talking about Flamineo compared to Satan you can discuss why the language of both texts makes the two similar/different (the adjectives used to describe them, the settings they’re found in) and why the writers might have presented them differently (Satan is a Biblical character, one who many contemporary readers would have instantly seen as evil – even if a modern audience don’t - whereas Flamineo is a more ambiguous character).

Using an example I’m going to talk you through how to answer an essay question which requires comparison between texts:

Choose a question. See how it applies to one text and then to another through making mindmaps/notes. I chose “ ‘In order to gain liberation women must use their feminine qualities or get rid of them’. Discuss with reference to the three texts you have studied.” and I would use the question with Carol Ann Duffy’s The World’s Wife, Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber (a collection of short stories) and Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing.

Therefore I started off by thinking about the position of women in all three texts: in Duffy’s the women seem strong and the fact that she’s chosen historical figures and is rewriting their stories is important, whilst in Carter’s the women seem powerful and the rewriting of fairytales to change views of women is also important and in Shakespeare’s play women such as Beatrice are presented as highly intelligent and witty, but other characters such as Hero are virtually silent throughout the play and therefore seem problematic.

First pick apart the question ( when you actually go to write your essay you can acknowledge that you have done so in your introduction). What is a ‘feminine quality’? What do the writers see as feminine qualities? Duffy and Carter were writing as part of Second and Third Wave Feminism so for them a ‘feminine quality’ would have differed hugely from what Shakespeare thought of as a ‘feminine quality’. For them, ‘feminine qualities’ are often constructs of men, not “true” qualities really.  

Examiners like it if you can show you have really thought about the question itself and whether the question itself is worth arguing with. Here you can also show your awareness of the different contexts the writers have: Shakespeare was writing in a century in which women were expected to conform to certain ideals and were seen as mothers, wives, daughters, not the heroes and powerful figures that people Carter and Duffy’s work.

 However you must be careful not to lump any writers together – although Carter and Duffy seem to have similar views, make sure you signal that they are different writers with different aims.

I would look at motherhood in all three texts since it is a significant theme throughout – and could be called a ‘feminine quality’ as it is usually. It is quite a good idea to choose a theme that runs through all the different texts but then look at how it is presented differently. So, whilst in Carter’s ‘The Bloody Chamber’ and Duffy’s ‘Thetis’ or ‘Queen Herod’ the mothers are hugely powerful (which you can show through in depth language analysis) which reflects the writers stances as feminists (bring in some context here), the mother in Much Ado About Nothing goes unmentioned. Instead women are vulnerable to men’s attacks, as when Hero is viciously humiliated and condemned by her father and fiancée. Women are therefore seemingly passive and submissive in Shakespeare’s texts, when they are strong and active in those of Duffy and Carter.

But it is worth always COMPLICATING your argument and being able to show that you have thought of all sides of the argument. Hero might be ‘passive’ in Much Ado About Nothing, but Beatrice is a completely different story (and whilst we’re on the theme of mothers, in some productions Antonio is played by a woman so there is some kind of mother figure, even if still ineffectual which is important). You could find instances where the language she/Shakespeare uses shows her power and intelligence.

In these instances she seems just as powerful as the women in Carter and Duffy’s work. Now bring in context once more: However, is this a good thing in Shakespeare’s view? Is Beatrice dangerous BECAUSE of her intelligence and is that why she has to be safely married off? In the two modern, female writers’ work the women don’t always even marry - their sexuality isn’t dangerous but empowering.

Integrate at least two texts into each paragraph – don’t do one paragraph on one text and then another on the other text so that it reads as para 1) Carter para 2) Duffy para 3) Shakespeare. This will force you to compare the two.

So if you’re struggling to find differences between Carter and Duffy for instance or another two very similar writers, to the point where your essay doesn’t seem to be advancing in terms of argument (this is a danger of only talking about similarities), talking about the differences between how the two have treated the same fairytale, Little Red Riding Hood, in ‘Little Red Cap’ and ‘Wolf Alice’ for example, could raise interesting issues.

It doesn’t have to be as specific as this – Duffy and Carter are really good for comparison and you might not have texts that have such a strong link (the fairytale). However you can always choose a theme that crosses both texts and stick to this. For instance, when comparing Paradise Lost and The White Devil, which don’t seem very similar at all, you could find similarities in the way the theme of corruption is treated and yet COMPLICATE your argument by finding differences underlying this (perhaps due to context as The White Devil is based in a courtly setting whereas Paradise Lost speaks of religious corruption – although it reflects the corruption in the government Milton had worked under).

You can also look at the specifics of the marking scheme: to achieve a good mark in A03 you must be able to compare the three texts, but you are also awarded marks from A03 for bringing in critics. So if you talk about Duffy’s work and then use a quote from a critic (or just an idea, you don’t have to quote them exactly especially in an exam), you would get marks. Therefore, don’t worry too much about constantly comparing the texts. Try always to link them, but if you’re struggling on a certain point or you want to show a difference between them, perhaps bring in a critics argument. This shows that you have read widely about the texts and can show specialist knowledge and it allows you to focus on the detail of a text.

This seems like a lot of information and you might be wondering how you could structure an essay that has to include all of this. But really, a good essay structure that you use all the time can be applied to a comparative essay too. So if you normally write 1) an intro 2) paras agreeing with the question 3) paras arguing against the question 4) a conclusion this could work here as well. Or you can find a new structure. The important thing is that you simply have to include more than one text in each paragraph. This is tricky but it’s supposed to be – and if you can achieve it you’ll get high marks.

So your essay might go something like this (you might have to split up paragraphs because obviously you’ll have a lot to say about each text but make sure you mention at least two authors in each para):

Intro

Para 1: Explore how Carter, Duffy and Shakespeare present mothers – women using their feminine qualities, which supports the question.

Para 2: Do any of the characters rid themselves of feminine qualities within these works? What are feminine qualities? You could talk about Beatrice compared to Little Red Cap and The Bloody Chamber – each possesses a violence not usually attributed to women. So does this argue against the question?

Para 3: Do the texts really show women either ‘using’ or discarding their ‘feminine qualities’? Or are they using their intelligence and sexuality, two qualities never previously seen as ‘feminine’, to gain real liberation? Argue that the question itself needs adapting.

Conclusion: Whereas Carter and Duffy show a new version of femininity as a kind of power, subverting old ideas about “feminine qualities”, this power is seen as dangerous in Much Ado About Nothing as Beatrice, the only powerful female figure in the play, is ultimately silenced by the power men possess over her and her complicity in this.

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